PurchaseNah! Not now!

5.2 Marketing and Analytics

Stores are as good as the number of people buying from it. In this episode, we'll give you an overview of the different marketing and analytics features on Shopify and how you can use these to tell the world about your store.

Additional Resources: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1mv2zgRS1cx59_vtVCU7B8wDXaefkkDp_SYqDtVkkizw/edit?usp=sharing

Okay! 

Now that you’re here, lets move to one of the trendiest skills of the 2000s. Digital marketing. We don’t have to say much about why marketing is important.  I’m sure you know exactly why a store needs to market itself - whether through social media, emails, online events or the like. 

Digital Marketing helps acquire customers and brand value, in turn, boosting store revenue. 

Customers don't depend just on content or word-of-mouth before buying a product anymore. They make sure to read reviews across platforms.

We’re not going into details here because every business requires different marketing strategies and campaigns, and honestly, that would require a whole course in itself. Which we have, by the way, for Email Marketing, Instagram Marketing, and Facebook Ads! 

For now, we’re going to show you what Shopify provides and how you can set it up. 

On the Admin dashboard, click “Marketing”. 

Here’s what opens up. You’ll see sections on “Results from Marketing”, “Recent marketing”, “Marketing Apps”, and then some more informative content down below. 

Let’s start with Campaigns. On the top right corner, you’ll find “Create Campaign”. Once you click that, this is what will pop up. Under “all”, you’ll find all the campaigns you could use, and they’re also divided by “Ads”, “Email”, “Social Post” and “SMS”.

Let’s go ahead and see what this Shopify Email option has for us. Once you click that, you’re taken to all the Email templates Shopify has to offer. 

Choose one and you’ll see the Email builder where you can edit things as you like. You can add a subject, preview text, and edit what the actual email looks like: font, colour, alignment etc. 

This is obviously just an example, you can also integrate other email marketing apps or continue using what you’re comfortable with. Like we mentioned before, we have a whole course on Email Marketing that covers all this in excruciating detail. 

Ok now back to the dashboard. What you’ll find is that your untitled email draft that we just created shows up here, since that’s our most recent campaign. 

Let’s check out the campaign pop-up again. 

If you click on Ads, you’ll find options like “audience building ad” or “dynamic retargeting ad”. This probably sounds like gibberish to you right now, and Facebook ads are a whole world in themselves really. So if someone on your team (or you!) know how to run those, you just have to select “Set up Facebook”. 

Moving on, as you can see here we have the Abandoned Checkout emails by Shopify already running. This is set up by default. Once you click that, you’ll find this page which has, well, a lot of stuff. 

Let’s go through these one by one. 

  1. First, customer accounts.

    If you enable this, Shopify stores password-protected information about a customer's identity, order history, and current order status. Your customers' details, like their address information, will be pre-filled from the stored information during checkout.

    Here’s where you can choose how you’d like your customer to check out, as guests, customers, or either.

  2. Next, customer contact. These are the details that a customer has to put in to checkout. Phone number, email ID, and so on.
  3. Then we have Form options. Here’s where you have to choose all the questions you’d like in the form.

  4. Number 4 - Order processing. This sets shipping and billing addresses to be the same, and also allows for address autocompletion.

  5. Moving on, we have email marketing. This allows you to show a sign-up option at checkout so you can send marketing emails to your customers.

  6. Finally, we come to abandoned checkouts. Shopify gives you the option to automatically send abandoned checkout emails. You can choose whether you’d like to send these to everyone, or just your email subscribers. You can choose to send it after a few hours. 

And then - Save! 

Your checkout and abandoned cart process is finalised! 

Back on the dashboard, you’ll find Marketing Apps. Remember that you can always integrate apps within Shopify to fulfill your marketing needs - the options are endless. 

Now on the left side, below Marketing you’ll find “Campaigns” which is basically just a dashboard that helps you track all the campaigns you’re running. 

Below that, we have “Automations”. 

Marketing automations show ads and send messages to your customers based on their behaviour. 

It’s pretty cool. Remember how you got an email as soon as you signed up for this course? Spoiler alert - Lancify does NOT have an employee dedicatedly typing and sending emails to people who sign up for a course. Take our word for it - efficiency is key. And automated emails? Well, they’re efficient. 

Like we said before, there are a bunch of apps that help you do exactly this. 

Since the abandoned checkout email is automated, you’ll find that here as well. Like creating a campaign, you follow the same exact steps to create an automation. Here we have a Google Smart Shopping campaign to display your products in Google searches. 

For email and SMS, you can add other apps. Also, you can always pause, edit or delete any automation. 

And that’s that! We covered quite a bit here.

Again, we are not getting into excruciating detail, because each marketing function has so much to offer.

Now, moving on to Analytics. 

For online store owners, it’s difficult to observe customer reactions. 

Since the whole system is virtual and the people making purchases are distant, tracking their behaviour is.. Impossible. Or is it? This is the function that analytics serve. 

Information gathered from analytics lets you “visualize” them based on specific sets of numbers. What do you do with this information? Well, with a deeper understanding of customers’ actions, store owners can serve them that much better. They can engage with them, and ultimately, increase their sales. 

Once you understand why visitors to your site behave the way they do, you can think of ways to target them better. Remember, you can’t improve what you don’t measure. That’s one of the biggest lessons here. Always. measure. 

Shopify makes that pretty simple. We’ll go on and show you how you can find the data you need, right on your dashboard. But, we recommend you set up third-party analytics services, such as Google Analytics. This will help you gain even MORE insights and improve the business. 

Okay, let's look at how you can set this up. 

On the Admin Dashboard, go to “Analytics”. This is what your overview dashboard should look like.

Now Lancify Kicks isn’t really doing much business - since it’s, well, a made up brand - but I sincerely hope your dashboard doesn’t look like this. 

There are a few metrics that you’ll see here like “Total Sales”, “Online Store Sessions” “Returning Customer Rate”, “Conversion Rate, “Total Orders” and lots more. We’ll look at some of these in a bit. 

Under Analytics you’ll also find “Reports”. These are monthly reports that Shopify gives you access to so you know exactly how your business is doing. And finally there is Live View, where you can see how visitors are behaving. Live! We know. It’s a little creepy. But it’s for the best. 

That’s pretty much an overview of Shopify analytics.

Now let’s look at what you - as a Shopify store builder - should look at when building your first few stores. These are the basic e-commerce metrics that you should focus on first, before moving on to more nuanced ones. 

  1. First, we have Traffic:

It is SO important to monitor the number of visitors you’re getting to your shop.

While a high-level look of your numbers is important, there are some specific metrics that can be even more useful. Spotting these and acting on them can make your chances of growth even higher. 

You need to understand where these people are coming from, and how many there are. That might be in terms of marketing channels, which tells you how they found your store, but it’s also where in the world they’re living. Those two pieces of information are crucial in helping you plan and target your advertising. 

Once you’ve got a solid understanding of how people find your store, and where they’re coming from, you can make better decisions about everything from which channels seem to be working, to the importance of international shipping to your business.

  1. Conversion Rate. 

Your store’s conversion rate is also super important because it shows you whether or not your visitors are converting to customers. That’s the real test. 

There’s not just one conversion rate you should be looking at. There are three numbers in particular which you should track closely: how many people add items to their cart, how many reach the checkout, and how many people then go on to purchase. Each stage can provide useful information about how your store is performing.

Conversion rate optimization (CRO) is a discipline in itself, and how you go about it depends on your industry, your customers and your product. While there will always be some customization based on your store’s specific traits, reviewing the basics is a great place to start. You can read more about this a little later in the resources document below.

  1. Total sales

Talking about core metrics without mentioning total sales is like  making an omelet without any eggs. Ridiculous. The number of total sales is make-or-break for your store, and a number you’re sure to have your eye on even without being told so.

When you’re looking at total sales, you want to really understand what influences your sales numbers and why. This includes how each of your sales channels are performing, and how your sales are trending over time. 

To get a deeper understanding of how everything works together, you can start by looking at a few months of sales data, broken down by day. Are you seeing any trends as to when people are making purchases? If yes, ask yourself if you know why that’s the case, and how you might be able to build sales on other days, increase the amount of sales on popular days, or both. The reports that Shopify provides will come in handy here. 

  1. Average order value

Your average order value (AOV) shows you how much the average customer spends in a single transaction on your store. This directly influences important aspects of your business, such as your margins or your ability to absorb shipping costs. 

Increasing your AOV can boost your revenue without needing to find new sources of traffic or ways to improve your conversion rates. This is a powerful metric to track and optimize.

  1. New vs. returning customers

Another important measure of your store’s performance is the mix of new versus returning customers. You’ll ideally see a balance between new customers and returning customers, and what constitutes a good percentage of new customers may change over time.

As a general rule, it’s both easier and cheaper to convert an existing customer than it is to find and convert a new one. 

Then again, everyone’s a new customer at some point. You’ll want to keep a certain percentage of new customers in order to keep growing your business.

It’s all quite exciting, if you ask me. 

That’s about it for marketing and analytics. It might seem like a lot, but we’re confident you’re going to get the hang of this in no time once you start engaging with it. 

For now, give yourself a pat on the back and roll over to the next episode. 

powered by Typeform

Next episode

Series episodes

I. Understanding E-Commerce
I. Understanding E-Commerce
1.1 Introduction to E-Commerce
1.1 Introduction to E-Commerce
1.2 Forms of E-Commerce
1.2 Forms of E-Commerce
II. Shopify Partner Program
II. Shopify Partner Program
2.1 Getting Started
2.1 Getting Started
III. Understanding your Client’s Needs
III. Understanding your Client’s Needs
3.1 Setting Foundations
3.1 Setting Foundations
3.2 The Process - From Pitching to Delivering
3.2 The Process - From Pitching to Delivering
IV. Getting to Building
IV. Getting to Building
4.1 Storefront Setup
4.1 Storefront Setup
4.2 Products and Collections
4.2 Products and Collections
4.3 Picking the Right Theme
4.3 Picking the Right Theme
4.4 Creating Essential Pages
4.4 Creating Essential Pages
4.5 Setting Up Payment Gateways
4.5 Setting Up Payment Gateways
4.6 Shipping and Fulfillment
4.6 Shipping and Fulfillment
4.7 Domains and Plans
4.7 Domains and Plans
V. Jazzing up your Store
V. Jazzing up your Store
5.1 App Integrations
5.1 App Integrations
5.2 Marketing and Analytics
5.2 Marketing and Analytics
5.3 What Makes a Great Store?
5.3 What Makes a Great Store?
VI. Maximise Shopify’s Partner Program
VI. Maximise Shopify’s Partner Program
6.1 Pitching Shopify to Your Clients
6.1 Pitching Shopify to Your Clients
6.2 Quick Pep Talk!
6.2 Quick Pep Talk!